✍ Global Variations of Print Name Card






Global Variations of Print Name Card

The Print Name Card in Japan is called "Famous Thorn". Usually, in the largest printing size, the company name is at the top, then the job title, and then the personal name. This information is written with Japanese characters, and the reverse side is usually Latin characters. Usually, Meishi may also include QR codes to provide contact information in a precise form of the machine, has not yet become a common practice. According to a 2007 survey, less than 3% of Japanese people have meishi printed with QR codes.

The card should be placed on the top two corners, face up and flipped, the person who receives the master brake can read it, and then use both hands to grasp it at the bottom two corners. It is impolite to put your finger on the name or other information. After receiving the "Famous Teacher", people are expected to read the card and designate the person's name and grade. Then, another person should be thanked, say "choudai itashimasu" ("I accept your Print Name Card") or "choudai shimasu", and bow. When exchanging meishi between different parties, for example, between the company ’s president and middle managers, it is appropriate for some merged persons to expand their Print Name Card in such a way that they are in a higher position The artificial replacement of meishi below or below.

Meishi should be placed in a smart holster that will not warm or wear, both of which are considered signs of disrespect or carelessness. The received famous poems should not be written on the pocket or in the pocket; if meishi is placed on the table, the recipient puts it on the top of the holster until they leave the table. If there are several people attending the meeting, and one person receives several meishis, the person with the highest rank will be placed on the leather box, and another person will be placed on the table.

The way the receiver treats the presenter's meishi indicates how the receiver will treat the presenter. Acts such as folding the card in half or putting the presenter's name in the back pocket are considered insults.

Japanese executives or officials usually have two names: one is Japanese, used by Japanese compatriots, in the order of Japanese names (surname first), and the other is used by foreigners, whose names are in Spanish (last name) .